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Vision treatment for vertigo

Timothy C. Hain, MD Page last modified: April 22, 2014

The eyes are part of the array of sensory inputs that we use for balance. Others include the ears, feet, and internal idea of where we are in space.

Disturbed vision can cause dizziness -- here are a few ways that this can happen.

Monovision

Some individuals do not want to wear glasses, and are given "monovision", where one eye is used for near and one for far viewing. In this situation, only one eye is used at a time (rather than the usual two). This reduces redundancy, it makes binocular fusion impossible, and it adds to the cognitive burden of processing vision. Not a good idea in a dizzy person. The fix is to buy two pairs of glasses, one for near and one for far.

Progressive lenses

Here, people are given glasses where the focus depends on where one is looking. In order to focus on an object, one must move one's head so that the eye position with respect to the glasses is optimal. This means that only the fovea (central vision) is in focus, and everything else is blurred as well as moving at different speeds due to the variable magnification of the lenses. Not a good idea in a dizzy person. The fix is to buy two pairs of glasses, one for near, and one for far.

The best situation for dizzy patients is to see clearly with both eyes.

 

 

Copyright August 3, 2016 , Timothy C. Hain, M.D. All rights reserved. Last saved on August 3, 2016